Maternal health in afghanistan

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention CDC in four parts of Afghanistan have found that Afghan women suffer from one of the highest levels of maternal mortality in the world, with almost half of all deaths among women aged 15 to 49 coming as a result of pregnancy and childbirth.

Maternal health in afghanistan

Agency for International Development USAID is proud of the progress made with many partners across the globe—improving health and saving lives in record numbers. USAID works with global partners in a number of cross-cutting issues that have a direct impact on health outcomes.

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Strategic Priorities USAID's global health programs have three strategic priorities that build on our success and focus our work, while building sustainable and resilient health systems in the poorest regions of the world.

Globally, child mortality has been cut in half since Through efforts in family planningmaternal and child healthmalariaand nutritionUSAID is working to prevent child and maternal deaths.

USAID's maternal and child survival programs are concentrated in 25 focus countries with the highest need, demonstrable commitment, and the potential to leverage resources from the public and private sectors to improve health outcomes.

As a key implementer of the U. Combating Infectious Diseases While scores of infectious diseases continue to threaten humankind, USAID-led efforts through the Emerging Pandemic Threats program are strengthening health systems around the world by building better capacity to detect outbreaks, mitigate transmission, and prevent epidemics.

Though still a critical issue, the prevalence of tuberculosis TB has declined by nearly 50 percent sinceand in alone, USAID successfully treated nearly 3 million people for TB and started more than 70, on multidrug-resistant tuberculosis MDR-TB regimens.

Maternal health in afghanistan

Working with Global Partners Investments in global health protect Americans at home and abroad, strengthen fragile or failing states, and promote social and economic progress. USAID encourages sustainable systems within countries and regional mentorship between countries, working collaboratively through partnerships to solve global problems.Dec 16,  · Women in Afghanistan still face gender violence and have limited legal protection.

Maternal health in afghanistan

But small gains in maternal health are critical for rebuilding Afghan society. Primary health care is the first step to building strong families, stable communities and productive nations.

South Asia :: Afghanistan — The World Factbook - Central Intelligence Agency

Learn how USAID and its partners have worked to advance primary health care and community health systems around the world. Health in Afghanistan. By Abdullah Qazi / March 5, Last updated: September 29, Afghanistan’s Ministry of Public Health has the responsibility to oversee all matters related to the health Afghanistan’s population.

Decades of war, civil unrest and natural disasters have taken a huge toll on Afghanistan. Despite recent progress, millions of Afghans still live in severe poverty, with a crumbling infrastructure and a landscape suffering from environmental damage.

Around 39 percent of Afghans live below the poverty line, with huge differences in living standards between those living in cities and those in.

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The inaugural national Black Maternal Health Week (BMHW) campaign, founded and led by the Black Mamas Matter Alliance, is a week of awareness, activism, and community building intended to. Afghanistan with six hundred thousand residents, which in had only one maternal health doc- tor.

NEW YORK / KABUL, 6 November - Surveys conducted by UNICEF and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in four parts of Afghanistan have found that Afghan women suffer from one of the highest levels of maternal mortality in the world, with almost half of all deaths among women aged 15 to 49 coming as a result of pregnancy and childbirth. Dec 16,  · Women in Afghanistan still face gender violence and have limited legal protection. But small gains in maternal health are critical for rebuilding Afghan society. The Global Polio Eradication Initiative is a public-private partnership led by national governments with five core partners - the World Health Organization (WHO), Rotary International, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

21 Panjshir residents live in villages that are largely inaccessible by roads, and floods and ava-.

UNICEF: Afghanistan one of worst places in world to be pregnant